The SCAT3 is a standardized tool for evaluating injured athletes for concussion and can be used in athletes aged from 13 years and older. It supersedes the original SCAT and the SCAT2 published in 2005 and 2009, respectively. For younger persons, ages 12 and under, please use the Child SCAT3. The SCAT3 is designed for use by medical professionals. If you are not qualified, please use the Sport Concussion Recognition Tool. Preseason baseline testing with the SCAT3 can be helpful for interpreting post-injury test scores.

The SCAT3 scoring summary includes the following sections:

  • Symptom evaluation
  • Cognitive assessment – Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC)
  • Balance examination
  • Coordination examination

If you want the scoring summary to be complete, make sure you fill in the sections above.

The ChildSCAT3 is a standardized tool for evaluating injured children for concussion and can be used in children aged from 5 to 12 years. It supersedes the original SCAT and the SCAT2 published in 2005 and 2009, respectively. For older persons, ages 13 years and over, please use the SCAT3. The ChildSCAT3 is designed for use by medical professionals. If you are not qualified, please use the Sport Concussion Recognition Tool. Preseason baseline testing with the ChildSCAT3 can be helpful for interpreting post-injury test scores.

A concussion is a disturbance in brain function caused by a direct or indirect force to the head. It results in a variety of non-specific signs and / or symptoms (some  examples listed below) and most often does not involve loss of consciousness.

Concussion should be suspected in the presence of any one or more of the following:

  • Symptoms (e.g., headache), or
  • Physical signs (e.g., unsteadiness), or
  • Impaired brain function (e.g. confusion) or
  • Abnormal behaviour (e.g., change in personality).

Note: A hit to the head can sometimes be associated with a more serious brain injury. Any of the following warrants consideration of activating emergency procedures and urgent transportation to the nearest hospital:

  • Glasgow Coma score less than 15
  • Deteriorating mental status
  • Potential spinal injury
  • Progressive, worsening symptoms or new neurologic signs
  • Persistent vomiting
  • Evidence of skull fracture
  • Post traumatic seizures
  • Coagulopathy
  • History of neurosurgery (eg Shunt)
  • Multiple injuries
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SCAT3 Assessment
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Child-SCAT3 Assessment

Note: The diagnosis of a concussion is a clinical judgment, ideally made by a medical professional. The SCAT3 & ChildSCAT3 should not be used solely to make, or exclude, the diagnosis of concussion in the absence of clinical judgement. An athlete may have a concussion even if their SCAT3 or ChildSCAT3 is “normal”.